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Nicole
37,

Posts: 194
PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 06 11:38 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Quick discussion question: Has being in a college setting, particularly a secular college, modified your opinion of public schooling and homeschooling? Has it strengthened your opinions on either of the institutions, or weakened them? Or has it had no effect whatsoever on what you think of early education?

Rachel Davis
36, Kentucky

Posts: 59
PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 06 8:45 am Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Good question, Nicole.

As I had no solidified opinions as to homeschooling before I came to school, I'm not able to compare them with my rather firm opinions now. I really had never been in a situation where I had to defend my position on schooling, like I've had to do here, so I thought it was a good thing, but didn't know why.

As a college student, even at a private Christian school, I've had several occasions where various people attempt to disparage my background and convince me that homeschoolers are anti-social, too sheltered, not well-rounded, have no opinions, have too many opinions, have no opportunities, stuck-up, too-smart, unlikely to succeed in society, and are just plain "weird." If they said that to my face, imagine of what they really think of us!

Because I have never been 100% gung-ho for homeschooling, due to some circumstances that affected my education, I considered their claims. Rather than turn me away from the prospect of homeschooling my kids, however, it merely created some definite opinions of how I want to homeschool.

I look at homeschoolers at my siblings---I can offer constructive criticism, but no one else can touch them. Very Happy In that, while I acknowledge that there are potential downfalls to homeschooling, I resent those who have met 1-2 homeschoolers in their lifetime and believe they are the source of all true wisdom and knowledge.

Al righht, now I'm rambling on. Sorry. Ok, seeing how people view homeschoolers (even "good" Christian people) has somewhat affected the way I want to raise my kids. Most importantly, I want them to be strong and firm because there will always be someone ready to challenge your belief system, both in secular and Christian circles.

Also, I want my kids to avoid stereotyping like the plague. I hate it when people I've never met assume I'm socially inept because I'm homeschooled---in turn, we should never make judgements about public-schoolers because of where they were educated. It's easy to do. I know homeschooling families who refuse to let their children closely associate with kids who attend public school because they are inherently a bad influence. While that is their choice and their attempt to protect their children (which is commendable), to me, that would be little different from avoiding a homeschooler because they are "weird." Each homeschooler is different, as is each public schooler. I desperately want people to judge me by what they know of my personality and character, not by my education. I plan to give them the same curtsey.

Didn't mean to write a book. Wink

PamelaVV
38, Fayetteville, Arkansas

Posts: 1517
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 06 7:37 am Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Maybe I'll reply more later, but for now I'll just say that I'm way more gung-ho about home schooling than I was before...

Rachel
35, Philadelphia, PA

Posts: 1009
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 06 6:25 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

I don't know that college has really changed my views on homeschooling one way or the other.

I've met a lot of great people at college who come from a variety of educational backgrounds, including homeschooling, public school, and parochial school.

Allison88
32, Alabama

Posts: 69
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 06 10:46 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Well, since this is semester number 2, we'll see how I feel come graduation, but here's my 2 cents right now...

Before my family moved to Alabama when I was 14, I would say that my opinion of public schoolers did err a bit on the side of being judmental. However, after the move, my family joined a church where there were alot of both public and homeschooled students my age. I came to see that it's not educational background, but rather faith in Christ that should draw the body of Christ together. For the first time since I left public schools in 4th grade, I began to have friends who were public schooled. However, I did pick up the idea that homeschoolers were not as well educated as public schoolers, and that somehow, when I got to college, I would be worse off for it.

However, while my opinons of my public schooled friends have not changed (it still makes little difference in determining my friends), I no longer hold the opinion that homeschoolers aren't well educated. What I never realized is that homeschooling actually does more to prepare you for college than I would have thought. In fact, my Psychology professor told me that he has had only 3 students who finished his class with good solid, over 100 averages, and every one of them was homeschooled. He believes the reason for this is that they knew how to study.

That sounded odd to me at first, because I had thought that homeschoolers had no study skills compared to public schoolers, but the more I've thought about it, the more sense it makes. Reason being, at least in the way I was schooled, when a homeschooler wants to learn about something, they're usually encouraged to learn about it. They learn to use the library to research it, search the internet, and talk with professionals. You make notebooks on it, draw diagrams, and talk about it every waking moment until you tire of it before finding another subject of interest. And so continues the cycle. It seems to me that this cycle of questioning, researching, writing down, and then teaching it to others helped me better prepare for college because I learned study skills that I now have to put to work every day.

Also, it seems like alot of public schoolers become apathetic early on in their education. And who can blame them? I went to public schools for several years in elementary school, and sitting behind a desk five days a week for 7 hours can kind of have a numbing effect long before you ever enter college. It seems like many kids learn to hate to learn early in life.

So far, two thumbs up for homeschooling! Very Happy

PamelaVV
38, Fayetteville, Arkansas

Posts: 1517
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 06 12:04 am Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Ditto, esp. to those last two paragraphs! I agree completely...although I've only had two years of college (so far), so I'm not speaking from much more experience.

Andrew Plett
36, Vancouver, Washington

Posts: 1506
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 06 11:14 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Has my college experience changed my perception of public and home education?

Well my views of both before college were as follows:
Homeschooling gives the best preparation for the future.

Public education disables students by removing their desire to learn.

I hold almost the same view today. I've said before elsewhere how many students ask the instructor rather than figure things out for themselves. But there are some students at college who still are interested in learning new things....they are a minority, though.

Jennifer
39, 39?, -105?

Posts: 1885
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 06 6:29 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Allison88 wrote:

Also, it seems like alot of public schoolers become apathetic early on in their education. And who can blame them? I went to public schools for several years in elementary school, and sitting behind a desk five days a week for 7 hours can kind of have a numbing effect long before you ever enter college. It seems like many kids learn to hate to learn early in life.

Andrew wrote:

Public education disables students by removing their desire to learn.



Ditto - and I think this actually started happening to me somewhat while I was in college. I think that college made my pro-homeschooling attitude even stronger, and I think that college RADICALLY changed my opinion of high education, which I now regard as little better than lower forms of public schooling. However, it also made me see alot more of the world than I had before, made me confront people with other ideas, etc, and in that sense I think it made me rethink how I want to homeschool my own kids. I want them to be much more involved in the community than I was. For them, I want homeschooling to be less focused on being schooled at home, and more focused on not being schooled at all. Educated, absolutely! But, not schooled!

Alot of my changed philosophy came through a reaction against college. I hated college most of the time, and went to the library to find refuge, solace and ammo in my hatred of college. What I discovered was that I was not alone, and other people who didn't like the school system had written books - which I devoured!

I think every book like this I ever read was written by a teacher (or often an ex-teacher). So, it was more focused on what NOT to do, rather than what TO do. Interestingly enough, I think that many homeschoolers copy public schooling methods in their own homes! That is what I want to avoid when I homeschool. I think that parents who do this usually do it out of ignorance and insecurity. As a homeschool parent, I would hope to more bold and aware than my own parents were (not that they weren't in their own way, but if I do not go further and build on what they've given me then I've done nothing).

Hannah
35,

Posts: 12
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 06 9:53 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Andrew wrote:

Public education disables students by removing their desire to learn.
.


basically, ditto what Andrew said Smile

I started college biased towards homeschooling (how could I not? I loved it Smile), but now I've seen for myself how the educational values I was taught as a homeschooler (self-motivation, independent thinking, a love for learning, etc) benefit one in college and beyond.

Also, I became even more convinced that "missing out" on public high school was a wonderful blessing, because not only am I less bored with the classroom setting than my peers who suffered through 12+ years of it, I also am more sure of my self and my beliefs than I would have been at 13. It's much easier to ignore some of the junk that goes on in the public school atmosphere at 20 than it would be at 13, I'm sure!

Nicole
37,

Posts: 194
PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 06 11:52 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

This was a great thread to read. When Jessica came up for a visit in January we spent a while discussing how (if it all) our college experiences had affected our view of homeschooling. Some day I'd love to see a really thorough study of this question, if such a thing is possible. Even asking for input here will necessarily mean skewed results since HSA members are overwhelmingly here because we loved homeschooling.

Now, to answer my own questions:
Quote:
"Has being in a college setting, particularly a secular college, modified your opinion of public schooling and homeschooling? Has it strengthened your opinions on either of the institutions, or weakened them? Or has it had no effect whatsoever on what you think of early education?"


Oh, golly, Nicole. What brilliant questions you ask. How probing you are. Why don't they give you some big journalist award and have done with it?

Being in a secular college setting for the past two years has more than modified my feelings on public schooling and homeschooling. It has intensified my feelings on them both. When I started college I already knew, based on my experiences growing up, that I loved homeschooling. I enjoyed the time with my family, I knew that homeschooling allowed me more time to follow my interests and to better interact with those outside my immediate peer group. I was concerned about my abilities to actually do well in a formal classroom setting.
Finding that this concern was grievously unfounded started me on the track of exploring these issues further. I expected to be at a disadvantage when it came to note taking, exam taking, classroom participation, etc. What I failed to realize is that these things are really quite immaterial, that they are only as good as the substance behind them. Homeschooling gave me that substance and allowed me to translate it into classroom form. Public school gives only the empty form and very little substance.
In homeschooling all learning is interconnected. As has been discussed and rediscussed multiple times here at HSA, homeschooling should be a lifestyle of learning. In most of my college classes such an interconnectedness is artificially imposed and no one seems to really believe it exists. Such cynicism is disheartening, to say the least.

Another thing I think we fail to recognize with homeschooling is how very unique its students are. Public schools encourage sameness, and that sameness stays strong in college. Group-think occurs too frequently.

I had one atrocious professor my first semester, and I sometimes wonder if my feelings would be a little less intense if it hadn't been for her impositions and influence. They may have been less intense, but I do think the conclusions I've reached still hold true. Andrew summed them up brilliantly as:
Quote:
Homeschooling gives the best preparation for the future.

Public education disables students by removing their desire to learn.


Someone without the desire to learn also lacks respect: respect and appreciation for what *can* be learned. My time in college has made me think even more strongly that public schools create apathy in their students, and this apathy does not leave the same day as graduation. It sticks around.

(And none of this post is meant to state or imply that all public schooled students must necessarily be disrespectful or uneducated or apathetic. There are many that are not, and they are brave indeed).

Evan Pederson
39, New Hanover, IL

Posts: 4240
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 06 1:24 am Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

My vews haven't changed much, but I guess you could say they've solidified. I never felt that homeschooling as it is currently practiced is ideal, but only that it's pretty good, and way better than any of the alternatives. I have a few ideas about how it might be improved, especially for the highschool years, and especially if the student is technically inclined, and they haven't changed much since I graduated.

Nicole
37,

Posts: 194
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 06 10:10 am Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

I wouldn't argue that homeschooling as it is now is perfect, either. I don't think we'll ever achieve perfect education. I do think it is much closer to ideal than public schooling, though, and my goal is to be moving closer to that ideal.

So how would you improve it, particularly if a student is technically inclined? One great thing about being a homeschool grad is that we don't have to start back at square one like our parents did. They did the hardest work for us, now we get to reap the benefits.

Shi Anne Higgans
33,

Posts: 629
PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 06 5:51 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

[whoops, double]



Last edited by Shi Anne Higgans on Mon Apr 17, 06 5:52 pm; edited 1 time in total
Shi Anne Higgans
33,

Posts: 629
PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 06 5:52 pm Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

Nicole wrote:
Quick discussion question: Has being in a college setting, particularly a secular college, modified your opinion of public schooling and homeschooling? Has it strengthened your opinions on either of the institutions, or weakened them? Or has it had no effect whatsoever on what you think of early education?


Seeing the crazy people here has made me very glad to have been homeschooled and not corrupted by the system. (This is on very broad terms, of course - homeschooling wasn't perfect for me, and there could have been improvements...) I was given a solid foundation before being introduced to public school. Smile

Joel
37, Lawrence, KS

Posts: 5
PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 06 10:18 am Reply with quote Report this to the Response Team

For those familiar with the term, I was probably "unschooled" more than I was homeschooled. Yet, because I was self motivated, College was teh perfect place for me because of me desire for knowledge.. in this sense, I have found that my positive outlook on homescholing hasn't changed. In fact, I now see it as the perfect preperation for what colleges are really after: Independant reseach. In fact, I have found that public school seems to have as one of its tenets that students should be either labeled as dumb if they connot keep up, or bored to death because school is easy. This need for student specific attention that homeschooling provides goes away to some degree in college because by then everyone has a much larger frame of refrence to understand things on a personal level, otherwise I woul dadvocate for Homeschooled college Razz

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